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Page | 12 To be considered for this sub-quota applicants must indicate that they meet the above eligibility requirements in their application and must also submit the required statutory declaration by the deadline order urispas 200 mg without a prescription. Applicants must also submit a certified copy of their original refugee or humanitarian visa if invited for an interview buy generic urispas 200 mg line. Applicants are encouraged to submit this document at the time of submitting their application to avoid delays in their invitation for interview 200 mg urispas free shipping. Students are located in Kangaroo Island, Strathalbyn, Goolwa, Murray Bridge and Mannum. Applicants must also submit the following documentation by the deadline: • Statutory declaration; and • Autobiographical Statement (maximum 600 words). Applicants are also required to submit a letter from an acceptable source as evidence that confirms they meet the rural eligibility criteria if invited for an interview. Applicants are encouraged to submit this document at the time of submitting their application to avoid delays in their invitation for interview. During the selection process applicants will undertake a semi-structured interview and participate in a range of activities. Applicants will be advised of any available reimbursement at the time of invitation. Applicants offered a place in this sub-quota will enter a rural stream that will provide innovative rural experiences throughout each year of study. Applicants are required to submit a separate Flinders statutory declaration for each sub-quota for which they wish to be considered. Please note that documents submitted after this date will not be accepted and applicants will not be considered for the relevant sub-quota. Applicants should note that a person who makes a false statement in a statutory declaration is guilty of an offence under Section 11 of the Statutory Declarations Act 1959 and may have their offer withdrawn as a result of the provision of inaccurate or incomplete information. Additionally, Australian rural applicants who are invited to interview will be required to provide documentary evidence that confirms they meet the rural eligibility criteria. Acceptable sources of documentary evidence include supporting letters from a: • School • University • Medical Practitioner • Dentist • Employer • Lawyer Letters from one or more sources must be original and on letterhead and include: • your full rural address; • the dates and duration that you resided at that address; • the author’s name, position and contact details. Applicants are encouraged to submit this document at the time of submitting their application to avoid delays in their invitation for interview. Humanitarian Visa Humanitarian Visa applicants are required to provide a Flinders statutory declaration which confirms that they hold, or have held a refugee or humanitarian visa at some point in the past. Please note that documents submitted after this date will not be accepted and applicants will not be considered for the relevant sub-quota. In addition to this applicants who are invited to interview under the Humanitarian Visa Sub-quota must also provide a certified copy of their original humanitarian visa. Applicants are encouraged to submit this document at the time of submitting their application to avoid delays in their invitation for interview. Please note that documents submitted after this date will not be accepted and applicants will not be considered for the relevant sub-quota. In addition to this applicants invited to interview in the Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Sub-quota must also provide a document signed under the seal by an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander organisation in the community from which the applicant originates or is recognised, confirming that the applicant is recognised by that community. Applicants are encouraged to submit this document at the time of submitting their application to avoid delays in their invitation for interview. Northern Therritory Residency Status Applicants who are Northern Therritory residents are required to provide a Flinders statutory declaration confirming their residency when submitting their application. A Northern Therritory resident is defined as an Australian citizen or permanent resident who, at the time of commencement of the medical course, has: • resided with a permanent address in the Northern Therritory for a total of at least two years out of the last six years; or • resided with a permanent address in the Northern Therritory for a total of at least five years since commencing primary school. Please note that documents submitted after this date will not be accepted and applicants will not be considered for the relevant sub-quota. Additionally those applicants who identify as Northern Therritory residents and who are invited to interview for a Northern Therritory place will be required to provide documentary evidence that confirms they meet the Northern Therritory residency requirements. Acceptable sources of documentary evidence include supporting letters from a: • School • University • Medical Practitioner • Dentist • Employer • Lawyer Letters from one or more sources must be original and on letterhead and include: • your full address; and • the dates and duration that you resided at that address. Applicants are encouraged to submit this document at the time of submitting their application to avoid delays in their invitation for interview. Academic Transcripts Non-Flinders graduates of a Bachelor degree or equivalent, are required to submit a copy of their official academic transcript by 31 July 2018. Applicants are not required to provide academic transcripts for postgraduate study (i. If they wish to set an expiry date for access to the digital document please ensure the date selected is after February 2019 as the University may need to access the document up to this time. For further information about providing official academic transcripts via My eQuals see: www. It is an applicant’s responsibility to comply with any requests to provide further documentation, either in the original language or translated into English. Statutory Declaration Themplates Applicants may download a copy of the relevant statutory declaration/s from the online application portal. A copy of each template is also provided in this Guide which applicants may print, complete and upload to their application. The online application portal will remain open until this date to enable applicants to submit their transcripts. They will be provided with an online link to the Flinders Interview Tracker through which they can view the date, time and location of their interview and pay the interview administration fee. All applicants are required to attend their interview in person and alternative arrangements will not be considered. Applicants invited to interview are required to travel, at their own expense, to the interview venue (i. To avoid delays in the finalisation of their invitation to interview, applicants are encouraged to provide this documentation at the time they submit their application. These applicants will be advised of any available reimbursement at the time of invitation. Page | 18 The interviews conducted in both South Australia and the Northern Therritory is semi-structured and uses a common set of scenarios and questions for all applicants, to assess qualities considered important both for success in the medical program and in subsequent medical practice. The qualities assessed include: • Quality of motivation • Learning style and team skills • Communication skills • Pro-social attitude • Personal management and self-evaluation skills • Approach to decision-making Interviews will be conducted by a small panel. Interviewers are not provided with any information about applicants, other than applicant names. Failure to comply with these examination conditions may result in failing the interview. Bachelor degrees will be calculated on the basis of 50% or more of final year results. Applicants whose Bachelor degree contains specified credit are required to provide copies of the relevant official academic transcripts showing grades achieved in this study by 31 July 2018. Applicants whose Bachelor degree contains such results are required to provide copies of all relevant official academic transcripts by 31 July 2018. One year Bachelor degrees are considered for entry, however the qualification must be completed at the time of application. Part-time and overloaded study will be allocated to each calendar year of the degree by working backwards from the final year of study in the Bachelor degree using the full time equivalent load value. In accordance with the Flinders University Admissions Policy, Student Admission Procedure, Section 7 www. All medical students must meet a number of requirements to undertake clinical placements including immunisation, criminal history screening and student registration. Students will be asked to comply with the College of Medicine and Public Health immunisation and blood-borne viruses’ policy. Further information is available in the Health Advisory Booklet for Health Professional Students available from: www. If you are about to complete a Bachelor component of a double degree by 31 December 2018, provided you meet the other eligibility requirements, you are eligible to apply. Does an accelerated Bachelor’s degree (2 years) need to be Accelerated Bachelor degrees or Graduate Entry degrees (2 years of completed at the time of application to be eligible to apply? I have been excluded/precluded from a medical program offered at If you are currently excluded/precluded from studying a medical another institution, am I eligible to apply?

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The perspectives of individuals and groups shape and frame the understanding of medical professionalism purchase urispas 200 mg. The exchange and interplay of these different perspectives - discourse - involves concepts of: Individual professionalism; professionalism as an individual personal attribute cheap 200mg urispas overnight delivery, or set of attributes Interpersonal professionalism; professionalism as a feature that emerges through social interaction Collective professionalism; professionalism as an attribute or set of attributes relating to the “contract” between the medical profession and society Complex professionalism; professionalism as a dynamic construct which shifts over time buy urispas 200 mg fast delivery. The purpose of these Guidelines is basically a practical one: providing guidelines on developing and reinforcing professionalism, and dealing with professional defcits, which are useful to medical schools and students. The working defnition of professionalism that underpins these Guidelines is therefore as follows: Medical professionalism is the set of intrinsic values, expressed as extrinsic behaviours which justify the trust between patients and good doctors, and between the public and the medical profession. These values and behaviours include: Respect for patients demonstrated by patient–centred practice Ethical standards including honesty, integrity, empathy and altruism demonstrated by ethical practice Refection/self-awareness demonstrated by refective practice Personal responsibility for actions demonstrated by responsible behaviour, including safeguarding one’s own health and well-being Theamwork commitment demonstrated by effective communication and teamwork, including, where appropriate, acting as the leader of a team Social responsibility demonstrated by commitment to the health of the community. The attributes of professionalism are in most cases applicable to all stages of a doctor’s career, from the frst day in medical school until the day they retire from active practice. The issue of online professionalism, for example, is included in these Guidelines. The range of ways in which professionalism can be demonstrated will evolve; working as a very junior member of the clinical team is very different to being the leader of the team, but both require team-working skills. Students will inevitably be at a formative stage of understanding and demonstrating professionalism. Professionalism will evolve and it will adapt as global, national, local and individual circumstance adapt. Indeed, appropriate adaptation to changing circumstances is part of being a professional, as is a commitment to lifelong learning and personal and professional development. At its core, however, professionalism will continue to be based on key attributes. For the purposes of these Guidelines the key objectives are for students to demonstrate the level of professionalism appropriate to their place on the continuum of competence, and to demonstrate commitment to the maintenance and further development of their professionalism. Medical schools are best placed to assess best practice and the needs of their students in light of the type of curriculum, the ethos of the medical school, and available resources, and to make decisions about the details. However, some principles should be incorporated into these decisions, including the “seven Rs”: Professionalism should be: Recognised as a key competency of medical practice This core value is refected in modern medical curricula and promoted in these Guidelines. Any perceptions among students that professionalism is an optional extra or a “soft” subject should be tackled (including via assessment). Reality-based and rooted in clinically-oriented situations Early professionalism can appear to students to be rather abstract and hypothetical when the majority of their time is spent in lecture theatres, tutorial rooms, laboratories and libraries. Medical schools should maximise the relevance of early professionalism; students on clinical placements tend to appreciate at that stage the beneft of the grounding they were given. Real-patient focused This is particularly appropriate during and after major clinical placements. Refective Students need “space” to refect on their own professionalism or professionalism generally, through professionalism journals, narratives, refective pieces, in group discussions, as part of the feedback process with teachers and in other ways. They need a safe environment in which they can explore issues that have engaged them, troubled them or distressed them, including the issue of the inevitable limitations on their capacity to heal. Respectful Patients allow students privileged access to them (even in their own homes). Medical schools should stress the importance of respect in student/patient interactions, including appropriate examination of patients, appropriate boundaries, good communication, confdentiality, and dignity. Students demonstrating high standards of professionalism will encourage patients’ willingness to participate in teaching. Reinforced While professionalism should run like a thread throughout the curriculum, there are key milestones where medical schools should be particularly aware of opportunities to reinforce it, particularly before extended clinical placements and pre-internship. Related to other subjects There are many opportunities for schools to discuss and promote professionalism outside of formal, “badged” professionalism teaching, and to foster dialogue about professionalism issues arising in relation to a particular topic. Once again, medical schools are best placed to assess best practice and the needs of their students and to make decisions about the details. Assessment should focus not only on students knowing about professionalism but also on students being professional. Some principles should be incorporated into medical schools’ assessment policies and procedures, and assessment methods should: Be framed so as to emphasise the centrality of professionalism to the undergraduate curriculum and its parity with knowledge and clinical skills Be correlated to curriculum content and transparent, defned learning outcomes Be framed so as to assess interpersonal and situational professionalism as well as individual professionalism Use a variety of different assessment methods and tools Balance formative and summative assessment, continuous assessment and assessment by examination Integrate the fndings of assessment into the teaching and learning and assessment process Encourage students to refect and self-evaluate, on scenarios and real issues Maximise participation by clinical supervisors, junior doctors, other healthcare professionals, peers, and patients. Feedback to students (including face-to-face feedback) on their performance should be routinely available and should not be seen as an event that only takes place where there is defcit. While feedback on professional defcits is an initial step in tackling underperformance (dealt with in the second part of these Guidelines), effective feedback also recognises and reinforces good professionalism. Face-to-face feedback in particular is time-consuming for teachers, but appreciation of feedback by students, and their hopes for more, was a constant theme of the Council’s dialogue with students at accreditations, with particular reference to professionalism in the predominantly clinical years. In this regard, schools should support staff development in the assessment of professionalism, and facilitate research into the assessment of professionalism. There is a powerful “hidden curriculum” (sometimes more accurately a semi–hidden or informal curriculum) of tacit norms, values, and beliefs, implicit and unspoken, which embed or erode the formal messages of the overt curriculum. While the hidden curriculum is often used in a pejorative way, it should be noted that it can also be a very positive subliminal infuence. To use a simple medical analogy, compassion and empathy, honesty and integrity, respectful behaviour, and good communication are infectious, as is the opposite. They are adopted and perpetuated by means of a cycle of “cultural reproduction” when students become doctors and teachers themselves. In a medical education structure that still has echoes of the traditional apprenticeship system, this process is inevitable. The hidden curriculum is likely to be particularly infuential in the clinically- focused parts of the programme, where impressionable medical students are surrounded by new and unfamiliar experiences. The clinical environment is an ideal one for doctors to deliver messages by diffusion or “osmosis”, with the student subconsciously assimilating the lessons and mirroring the attitudes and behaviour that they themselves experience and that they observe. Students absorb the message that this is how “real doctors” act in the “real world”: act as individuals, with their medical peers, with trainees, with students, with others in the clinical team, with managers and above all with health service users and the wider public. Schools need to: Ensure that there is general awareness among staff and students of the issue of the hidden curriculum and its impact (it is important that the message to staff acknowledges that most staff are committed and receive little reward, with much teaching still reliant on goodwill) Develop an informal curriculum that consistently reinforces the values of the formal curriculum Provide advice on ways in which a positive message can be sent via the hidden curriculum, reinforcing messages about professionalism and the importance of professional behaviour that is provided in the formal curriculum Involve students in identifying and evaluating elements of the hidden curriculum as they are manifested from time to time Consider that there may be variations in the culture and therefore the hidden curriculum of different medical specialties Remind students that although it may be diffcult, and there may be pressure to conform, they have a responsibility to address unprofessionalism that they experience or observe, particularly in the clinical environment, initially by seeking advice. Key elements of professionalism are “contagious”: susceptible to being strengthened or weakened by good or poor role models. Role modelling may be the single most important component of the medical school experience as it relates to professionalism and the development of professional identity. Role models are not exclusively senior medical staff: senior students have recognised that they themselves can be role models for more junior students. The Council’s experience in accreditations shows that the majority of students have good insight into the importance of role modelling: they highlight best professional practice and recognise and are disappointed by its opposite. It is certainly unfair to apply to students the principles, polices and processes contained in guidelines if notably poor behaviour is being exhibited, and not tackled, among those who should be exemplars of good professional practice. Schools should also do everything that they can to develop good role models – including via staff development – and to ensure student exposure to them. Schools also need to identify and remediate poor role models, and student feedback can play an important part in this. There is a particular onus on those in formal or informal teaching leadership positions to ensure that their own standards of professionalism are high, and that they “cascade” this approach to other teachers and trainers. It is recognised that medical schools do not have a contractual relationship with teachers who are not university employees. Any defcits arising therefore cannot be addressed in the same way as they would be in a formal employer/employee relationship. However, the onus on accredited medical schools to provide a high quality learning environment requires appropriate standards of professionalism among educators, irrespective of the employment status of the teacher. Standards of professionalism among staff should be factored into the clinical placement decisions that medical schools make. The establishment of governance structures to provide for regular meetings between medical school and training site representatives is also helpful in this respect. The informal and hidden curricula have a very signifcant infuence on identity formation. Role models play a central role in developing and shaping the identities of the individual students and groups of students. Students adapt to and adopt characteristics associated with the individuals and the environment that they interact with. There are certainly benefts to developing a strong sense of self-identity and of shared identity.

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